Castles and Fortifications of England and Wales

CANTERBURY CASTLE


CANTERBURY CASTLE
Photo Charles Taylor

Canterbury's importance to the Romans lay in it being a port on the western side of the Wantsum Channel.
The city walls are mainly Roman, dating from the end of the 3rd century, though they were repaired in the 14th century and strengthened with a number of towers. At least half of the city walls are visible on the eastern side of the city, as well as the city's West Gate which dates from 1380. The other three gates were destroyed in 1648. A wooden motte and bailey castle was erected in 1066 and the motte, known as Dane John, is still visible. The large keep was rebuilt in stone in 1100 but by 1600 it was in ruins and the curtain wall was removed in the 18th century. The lower half of the keep still remains, the top floor having been destroyed in the 19th century when it was used as a coal store.


Photo Charles Taylor Photo Charles Taylor Photo Charles Taylor Photo Charles Taylor
City walls photo Charles Taylor City walls photo Charles Taylor City walls photo Charles Taylor Dane John motte photo Charles Taylor
Photo Charles Taylor Photo Charles Taylor The West Gate photo Charles Taylor The West Gate photo Charles Taylor

 

Directions
A290 Rheims Way, at the south end of Castle Street.
Castle St, Canterbury CT1 2PR

 



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